Quick Answer: Why Does The Monster See Himself As Different From The Biblical Adam?

Why does the creature compare himself to the biblical character Adam Do you think this comparison is accurate Why or why not?

He compares himself to the biblical character of Adam because he was the first of the human kind and supposed to have been the beloved creature of his creator however, he was shunned for not obeying his creators wishes.

I believe that a comparison to Satan would have been a more accurate comparison..

Why doesn’t the creature kill itself after this incident?

Why doesn’t the creature kill itself after this incident? The creature doesn’t kill itself because he believes there is still hope to talk to the old man, Delacy. … The creature decides to make contact with the old man when the rest of the family is not there.

What keeps Victor from killing himself at the beginning of Chapter 9?

What keeps Victor from killing himself at the beginning of this chapter? He feels guilty for bringing the monster into the world and feels selfish. … Peaceful and calm, but makes him feel depressed again. It also reminds him of his childhood.

Is the creature in Frankenstein a human?

The novel suggests that the creature cannot be accepted as human because he is a singular being, and therefore cannot be a part of a community. Since Victor made the creature, there is not another being that is the same as him. … Without the ability to relate, he cannot be human.

What does the monster think his creator owes him?

What does the monster think his creator owes him? A purpose! … The monster wants what humans have- and knows he won’t ever get it. This is why he asks his creator for a companion.

What impression does the monster give when he speaks?

What impression does the monster give when he speaks? He seems angry with Victor and has violent thoughts, as he is willing to, “glut the maw of death, until it be satiated with the blood of [Victor’s] remaining friends.” (68).

Why does the monster see himself like the biblical Adam?

Explanation: The monster in the book ‘Frankenstein’ written by Mary Shelly sees himself as Adam first. He says that he is the first creation of his creator, just like Adam. Similar to Adam, he has no connection with any other human.

How does the creature view himself?

The creature, on the other hand, has always seen himself as ugly yet capable of very human feelings. He sees that humankind can be godlike as well as wicked, and he recognizes that he, too, has the capacity for both.

How is Frankenstein’s monster like Adam?

The monster likens himself to Adam, the first human created in the Bible. He also speaks of himself as a “fallen angel,” much like Satan in Paradise Lost. In the Biblical story, Adam goes against God by eating an apple from the tree and even though He banishes Adam from Eden, He doesn’t speak harshly of Adam.

How does the creature convince Victor to listen to him?

In Frankenstein, the creature convinces Victor to make him a mate by appealing to his pity and his fear. He makes an eloquent case for his lonely state, rejected by all of humanity. He also warns that he will kill Victor’s friends and family if his creator does not provide him with a companion.

Which two characters from Paradise Lost does the creature compare himself to?

In Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, the Creature compares himself to both Satan and Adam from Paradise Lost by John Milton.

Why does the creature refer to himself as Frankenstein’s Adam?

Answer and Explanation: In Frankenstein by Marry Shelley, the creature compares himself to both Satan and Adam from Paradise Lost by John Milton. The creature compares himself to Adam, believing himself to be an innocent first creation, the first and only of his kind. He also compares himself to Satan.